argonauticae:

landscape with the fall of icarus - william carlos williams

argonauticae:

landscape with the fall of icarus - william carlos williams

(via mirroir)


"The Quiet World" by Jeffrey McDaniel

"The Quiet World" by Jeffrey McDaniel

(via selkfolk)

Day 3- Find the nearest book (of any kind). Turn to page 8. Use the first ten full words on the page in a poem. You may use them in any order, anywhere in the poem

*words will be bolded
**there are only eight words because two of the words are repeated

see me where you can, so i can see you too
i appreciate the way you’re into me
i know that once i go to you
all you’ll want to be doing is drawing me
and i will make the room for every sketch

Day 2- Who was the last person you texted? Write a five line poem to that person.

you said you wished you had a guitar that could breathe
we kissed for the first time in a record store
i can’t wait till we have all the time in the world
to park my car in another empty garage so you can
touch me again with our clothes in the way

Day 1- Write a poem where each line starts with a letter from your first name (an acrostic). It can be about anything, but it should not be about you or your name.

out of body is to judge the decisions you make yourself as an objective viewer
living as a woman or something like that
it’s like this
viewing yourself in a mirror feels like looking at a stranger
it’s like that
a life, that is

30 Day Poetry Challenge

profoundfuckery:

Day 1- Write a poem where each line starts with a letter from your first name (an acrostic). It can be about anything, but it should not be about you or your name.

Day 2- Who was the last person you texted? Write a five line poem to that person.

Day 3- Find the nearest book (of any kind). Turn to page 8. Use the first ten full words on the page in a poem. You may use them in any order, anywhere in the poem.

Day 4- Write a haiku. They’re often about nature, but yours can be about anything.

Day 5- Write a three line poem about lemons without using the following words: lemon, yellow, round, fruit, citrus, tart, juicy, peel, and sour.

Day 6- Write a poem of any length incorporating every word from your latest Facebook status.

Day 7- Take a walk until you find a tree you identify with, then write a poem using the tree as a metaphor for yourself or your life.

Day 8- Write a cinquain on a topic of your choice.

Day 9- Quickly jot down four verbs, four adjectives, and four nouns. Write a poem using all 12 words.

Day 10- Pick a one line song lyric to serve as an epigraph to your poem. Then, write the poem to accompany it.

Day 11- Write a list poem.

Day 12- Tell your life story in 6 words.

Day 13- Write a short poem that a child would like.

Day 14- Write a bad poem, make it as lousy as you can, do everything wrong, let yourself be awful.

Day 15- Post a poem (written by someone else) that you love (for any reason).

Day 16- Respond to the poem you posted yesterday with a poem of your own.

Day 17- Write a poem that employs a rhyme scheme.

Day 18- Write a poem without any end rhyme, only internal rhyme.

Day 19- Imagine yourself doing any household task/chore, then write a poem using what you’ve imagined as an extended metaphor for writing.

Day 20- Write a narrative poem detailing a specific childhood memory.

Day 21- Choose one of the poems you’ve already written and posted as part of this challenge and re-order it in some way. You could rearrange the lines or stanzas or even words in a line. Think of it as a puzzle!

Day 22- What is the first car you bought/drove/remember? Write a poem about it.

Day 23- Write a seven line poem that begins with “it’s true that fresh air is good for the body” (from Frank O’Hara’s poem “Ave Maria”) and ends with “this is our body” (from Gary Snyder’s “The Bath”).

Day 24- Write a poem that’s different in some way from anything you’ve ever written. Take a chance! Be wild!

Day 25- Write a poem that includes all of the following words: pistachio, ink, pebble, weather, varnish.

Day 26- Gather some magazines/catalogs you don’t mind cutting up and spend ten minutes flipping through them looking for words/sentences that spark your interest. Cut out the words as you go, and (at the end of the ten minutes) arrange the words to form a cut-out poem.

Day 27- Begin with the title “The Poem I’d Never Write.” Then, write that poem.

Day 28- Visit a virtual art gallery and look around until you find a piece that intrigues you. Write a poem inspired by the artwork.

Day 29- Briefly research a poetic form of your choice and write a poem according to the rules of that particular form.

Day 30- Write a poem employing extended metaphor to illustrate the experience of the last thirty days.

(via selkfolk)

"I leave myself about, slatternly,
bits of me, and times I liked:
I let them go on lying where
they fall, crumple, if they will,
I know fine how to make them walk
and breathe again. Sometimes at night,
or on the train, I dream I’m dancing,
or lying in someone’s arms who says
he loves my eyes in French, and again
and again I am walking up your road,
that first time, bidden and wanted,
the blossom on the trees, light,
light and buoyant. Pull yourself
together, they say, quite rightly,
but she is stubborn, that girl,
that hopeful one, still walking."

"Slattern," Kate Clanchy (via commovente)

(via ontothesea)

Non Stop Beautiful Ladies

(Source: arabellesicardi)

"

As I walked out one evening,
Walking down Bristol Street,
The crowds upon the pavement
Were fields of harvest wheat.

And down by the brimming river
I heard a lover sing
Under an arch of the railway:
‘Love has no ending.

‘I’ll love you, dear, I’ll love you
Till China and Africa meet,
And the river jumps over the mountain
And the salmon sing in the street,

‘I’ll love you till the ocean
Is folded and hung up to dry
And the seven stars go squawking
Like geese about the sky.

‘The years shall run like rabbits,
For in my arms I hold
The Flower of the Ages,
And the first love of the world.’

But all the clocks in the city
Began to whirr and chime:
‘O let not Time deceive you,
You cannot conquer Time.

‘In the burrows of the Nightmare
Where Justice naked is,
Time watches from the shadow
And coughs when you would kiss.

‘In headaches and in worry
Vaguely life leaks away,
And Time will have his fancy
To-morrow or to-day.

‘Into many a green valley
Drifts the appalling snow;
Time breaks the threaded dances
And the diver’s brilliant bow.

‘O plunge your hands in water,
Plunge them in up to the wrist;
Stare, stare in the basin
And wonder what you’ve missed.

‘The glacier knocks in the cupboard,
The desert sighs in the bed,
And the crack in the tea-cup opens
A lane to the land of the dead.

‘Where the beggars raffle the banknotes
And the Giant is enchanting to Jack,
And the Lily-white Boy is a Roarer,
And Jill goes down on her back.

‘O look, look in the mirror,
O look in your distress:
Life remains a blessing
Although you cannot bless.

‘O stand, stand at the window
As the tears scald and start;
You shall love your crooked neighbour
With your crooked heart.’

It was late, late in the evening,
The lovers they were gone;
The clocks had ceased their chiming,
And the deep river ran on.

"

"As I Walked Out One Evening" by W.H. Auden (via mysubconsciousjourney)

(via volitional-errors)

(via jimmynovaks)